Tag: Québec

The real impact of CETA: Global Economic and Commercial Agreement  

CETA

CETA WILL GIVE ACCESS TO 500 MILLION CONSUMERS

The Government of Canada claims that the Canada-EU Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) will give Canadian companies preferential access to 500 million European consumers, a market evaluated at $ 18 trillion[1] [2]. Accordingly, bilateral trade would increase by 20 percent and would increase Canada’s GDP by $ 12 billion a year. This would create nearly 80,000 new jobs and increase the average Canadian household’s annual income by $ 1,000. [3]

Are these predictions realistic ? What are the business opportunities for transport and maritime companies? In order to answer these questions, this text analyses the figures of Canada’s international trade with the rest of the world and the European Union. It also attempts to estimate the impact of this agreement on transportation and the Canadian marine industry.

1-SUMMERY OF THE AGREEMENT

The CETA is considered a modern and innovative agreement because it covers a wider field of activity and is more permissive than other free trade agreements, such as the WTO’s General Agreement on Trade and Services (GATS) or NAFTA. The main provisions concern directly or indirectly the maritime sector.

1.1 Non-discriminatory rules for the goods, services and public procurement sectors

The rules of the “national treatment” and the “most favored nation” are maintained for both the goods sector and the service sector. The first rule requires equal treatment between foreign firms and local businesses. The second rule provides that the signatory parties must give each other at least the same advantages as they would accord to a third State.

CETA also provides that Parties may not adopt or maintain measures to limit the number of enterprises, the value of transactions, the number of transactions or natural persons, and the participation of foreign capital.

1.2 Elimination of tariffs and

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JUNE 2016, OVERVIEW OF THE CANADIAN MARITIME ENVIRONMENT

By 2015, a lower demand for natural resources has had a considerable impact on the volume of cargo handled at Canadian port authorities.  There is a slowdown in activities in almost all port sites. However, this decrease has been more pronounced for 2016.

To understand the differences and determine cause of the declines, we will present an analysis of the activities of three Canadian port authorities; those of Vancouver, Montreal and Quebec City. In this regard, a composite indices measuring the Canadian port activity have been developed. These indices are based on trends in the international trade of  over 50 products shipped to  Canada (see annex to this article) and reflect the handling of volumes of industry trends. They can be used for comparisons, forecasts and calculations of optimization under constraints. Graphics that accompany the text illustrate both indices obtained from the actual data in the annual reports of the port authorities, and forecasts of the indices that have been developed.

ANALYSIS OF PORT SITUATIONS

The port of Vancouver

Vancouver-indexThe port of metro Vancouver is the largest port in Canada and one a major exporter of coal, minerals and wood products. In 2011, handled products, (including containerized products) grew from 122 million metric tons (mt) to 138 mt. It is the third most important port in North America, after South Louisiana (242 mt) and Houston (216 mt). The port of Vancouver metro ranks higher than the port of New York (120 mt). 80% of handled volumes are exported compared to 20% for imports.

Other major shipments from the port of Vancouver are (10.8 mt) wheat, cereals including canola (6 mt), large quantities of sulphur (2.6 mt), potash (8.7 mt), coal (35 mt), crude oil (1.96 mt) and forest (23 mt) products.

The decline that is indicated by the index, between … Lire la suite

MAY 2016, FUNDING FOR THE QUÉBEC MARITIME STRATEGY: ISSUES AND PERSPECTIVES

By Gilles Couture

The St. Lawrence River is the shortest waterway between Europe and the centre of North America. The transport system St. Lawrence-Great Lakes therefore constitutes a lever important for economic activity and industrial of the American continent. It is with this in mind that the main objective of the Québec maritime strategy is to give a new impetus to shipping on the St. Lawrence River by investing in port infrastructure; energizing Quebec shipyards; developing intermodal transport and maritime tourism; as well as investing in the research and development of marine technology in order to ensure the sustainability of the fisheries and aquaculture industry.

This strategy will generate private investment over 4 billion dollars of which more than 2 billion dollars only in the logistic pole of the Montérégie-Ouest. Total public investment from the various levels of Governments in infrastructure would reach $ 4 billion. The first round of funding from the Quebec Government has a budget of $ 300 million to support private by 2020 investment projects while $ 200 million will support the Quebec port and intermodal infrastructure projects. In total, the Government of Quebec’s contribution is estimated 1 billion $ for the infrastructure funding other than those related to the logistic pole of Vaudreuil-Soulanges.

Industrial-port areas

Through its maritime strategy, the current Government intends to create sixteen areas industrial-port ZIP to improve linkages between modes of transport and integration into international trade. To implement the ZIP the Government intends to enter, by the month of June, 2016, 16 agreements to create local committees where municipalities, port authorities and relevant ministries will be represented. Their mandate will be to ensure regional consultation, develop a plan of development of the port authority, annually update this plan, collaborate with stakeholders responsible for the attraction of investments, and ensure the … Lire la suite