Tag: europe

JUNE 2017 BUSINESS RESILIENCE PLAN IN THE MARITIME SECTOR

Resilience planPlans de continuité des activités

Introduction

This article is not a pedagogical guide or a scientific method for carrying out Business Resilience Plans (BRP). Rather, its objective is to highlight elements specific to the maritime sector.

Readers interested in acquiring further knowledge may refer to several excellent documents. (ex. Community Resilience Planning Guide )

This article is divided into two parts. The first provides a definition of a BRP. The second, focuses on a BRP in the maritime sector.

 

Part 1: Business Resilience Plan in General

1.1 What is a Business Resilience Plan (BRP)

A BRP’s goal is to ensure resumption and continuity of an organization’s activities following an event that disrupts its normal operation. It must allow an organization to meet legislative, regulatory or contractual obligations as well as economic requirements (risks of losing market share, survival of the company, image, etc.) following a particular event. Building BRP also includes identifying potential threats to an organization and applying a framework to ensure the organization’s resilience.

This type of plan has become, over time, an industrial standard rather than an exception. Increasing criminal and terrorist acts, transportation of dangerous products, risks of accidents damaging environment and health are among the causes. Most large and medium sized companies currently have some plan developed, to respond to a major situation. Many of them would face closures if their services were interrupted for any period without such a plan.

A BRP can forsee compliance control measures and an higher frequency of controls. Howerver, its main purpose is not to predict the nature of such measures to be implemented in order to prevent them. The is rather identified as a prevention plan, generally subject to a set of standards or regulations.

It should be noted that losses due to natural or man-made disasters are becoming increasingly important in Lire la suite

The real impact of CETA: Global Economic and Commercial Agreement  

CETA

CETA WILL GIVE ACCESS TO 500 MILLION CONSUMERS

The Government of Canada claims that the Canada-EU Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) will give Canadian companies preferential access to 500 million European consumers, a market evaluated at $ 18 trillion[1] [2]. Accordingly, bilateral trade would increase by 20 percent and would increase Canada’s GDP by $ 12 billion a year. This would create nearly 80,000 new jobs and increase the average Canadian household’s annual income by $ 1,000. [3]

Are these predictions realistic ? What are the business opportunities for transport and maritime companies? In order to answer these questions, this text analyses the figures of Canada’s international trade with the rest of the world and the European Union. It also attempts to estimate the impact of this agreement on transportation and the Canadian marine industry.

1-SUMMERY OF THE AGREEMENT

The CETA is considered a modern and innovative agreement because it covers a wider field of activity and is more permissive than other free trade agreements, such as the WTO’s General Agreement on Trade and Services (GATS) or NAFTA. The main provisions concern directly or indirectly the maritime sector.

1.1 Non-discriminatory rules for the goods, services and public procurement sectors

The rules of the “national treatment” and the “most favored nation” are maintained for both the goods sector and the service sector. The first rule requires equal treatment between foreign firms and local businesses. The second rule provides that the signatory parties must give each other at least the same advantages as they would accord to a third State.

CETA also provides that Parties may not adopt or maintain measures to limit the number of enterprises, the value of transactions, the number of transactions or natural persons, and the participation of foreign capital.

1.2 Elimination of tariffs and

Lire la suite

November 2016 Transportation by barge as an alternative to intermodal transport

Use of transportation by barge

The systems of transportation by barge have long been used as an alternative to land transport. This mean of transportation is competitive to trains and trucks. In addition, it significantly allows the reduction of the environmental footprint of the transport of goods.

There are two major segments in the market, long and the short distance.

Long-distance is used in large rivers, such as Mississippi, Rhine, Danube and St Lawrence in transporting the goods from one end to the other of the continents.

This system is competitive to trains and trucks, but its performance depends greatly on the quality of the underlying infrastructure and the interconnection of the navigational channels. In return, barges offer the advantage to adapt to different types of products transported and allow more flexibility for the navigation on the various courses of water. They offer capacities ranging from 350 to 11 000 tonnes of deadweight and use proven technologies.

On short distances, this type of transport is growing and presents new opportunities.  Pilot projects have demonstrated this effectiveness, in particular, to reduce congestion in the areas of access to port sites of international trade.

Despite the high volume of activities and the economic benefits that flow from port activities, access to facilities remains constrained due to the movement of trucks and trains. The comings and the goings of land vehicles pose a problem by the noise, air and ground pollution, and by the loss of time related to the traffic congestion. In addition, the congestion of port activities reduces the effectiveness of the supply chain by increasing the time of distribution of the goods to the markets of destination.

To solve these problems and, as a counterweight to the costly alternatives that the investments represent in the construction, enlargement and the optimization … Lire la suite

THREE MARITIME TRENDS FOR 2016

INTRODUCTION

At the beginning of 2016, the world economy is unsettled.  Stock markets are volatile and investors are worried.

Since recession of 2008, the maritime industry has had to restructure. A period of uncertainty and instability triggered by the rise of the U.S. dollar, slowing Chinese economy, collapse of oil prices, slowdown of the European economy and political uncertainties has ensued.

This analysis illustrates that the trends of the shipping industry are positive and encouraging. They predict that growth will remain higher than that of the world economy and will still continue and business opportunities will continue to present themselves. Three major trends are described: one,  the volatility of demand, another related to the the world economy, and a third,  maritime supply and public investments.

TREND 1: High volatility of demand

This first trend is due to globalisation which has increased the variability of risk. Such a ‘butterfly effect’, a simple modification of the conditions of the market in a specific area of the globe – for example in Asia – can have an impact on the supply and demand in different locations – for example in the United-States. This situation leads to less predictable demand for transport.

The fact remains that the maritime industry is, more than any other type of industry, sensitive to all forms of external disturbances, and particularly to international situations. These external variables over which the industry has no control, affect the ability of the industry to plan and structure itself to develop in the long term. Thus, changes in rates of Exchange and interest rates, changes in Government legislation, stock market declines can, in a single year, have important repercussions on the request and on the volume of the substances carried. Other external and unpredictable factors in the industry are equally important and … Lire la suite